RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 4/19/2020

Photo by Sophy Chen from Pexels

Like many Japanese words, om-rice is a portmaneau -- a new word created from combining two other words. In this case, it comes from “omelette” and “rice”, and the popular dish consists of fried rice with ketchup wrapped in an egg omelette. 

Made from basic ingredients like rice, ketchup, and hot dogs or chicken, it’s sure to be a hit. We break down the basics for you, then give some tips on how to change things up.

Ingredients (per serving)

  • ½ diced onion

  • 1 cup cooked rice

  • ½ hot dog, sliced into thin circles or cooked shredded chicken

  • 2 t olive or vegetable oil, divided

  • ½ t garlic powder

  • 1 T ketchup

  • Sprinkle of black pepper

  • 1 egg, beaten

  • Additional ketchup for garnish

  • Procedure:

    Heat the oil in a frying pan. 

    Toss the diced onions into the pan, stirring frequently.

    Add the meat when onions are almost translucent. Cook for about a minute, stirring frequently.

    Add the rice to the pan. Mix with the onions and meat. Make sure to break up the clumps of rice.

    Add the garlic powder, black pepper, and ketchup. Mix everything together so that the ketchup is spread evenly over the rice.

    Transfer the fried rice to a bowl.

    Add oil to the pan and let it heat up.

    Pour the beaten egg into the pan. Tilt the pan to spread the egg around in a thin layer.

    When it looks mostly cooked, flip to cook the other side.

    Spoon the fried rice into the center of the egg. Using your spatula, bring the sides of the egg up to cover the rice. It should look a bit like a burrito.

    Transfer the om-rice to a plate with the open side facing down.

    Garnish with more ketchup on top of the egg, if desired.

    Make It Simpler

    Wrapping the rice in the egg omelette can take some practice. If you're looking for a simpler presentation, spoon the rice into a bowl then lay the egg omelette on top tucking the edges down into the bowl.

    Additionally, the onions, garlic powder, and black pepper could make the dish a bit too spicy for some. You can leave some or all of them out if you'd like a milder flavor.

    Dress It Up

    We’ve made this recipe simple but you can make several changes to adjust to your taste. For instance, if you use fresh garlic rather than garlic powder, it will enhance the flavor. Green onions can give it a different taste.

    You can also change some of the ingredients to make use of what you have on hand. Instead of using hot dogs or chicken, use ground beef or diced ham. You can even add some vegetables, such as chopped cabbage or frozen peas.

    This recipe is simple, but delicious. Give it a try tonight.




    Tags: Cooking   recipes   simple living  
    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 9/17/2017

    Pizza is, objectively, the greatest food ever invented. It's portable, filling, easy to make in large portions, and (arguably) has some nutritional value as well. The patron saint of children's parties and companion to college students everywhere, pizza is beloved at all times of day. You can eat it hot, cold or--in the case of microwave pizza--as molten lava applied directly to the tongue. Perhaps the greatest part about pizza is the variety and ingenuity that have been applied to it over the years. There are twelve main styles of pizza in the United States, according to the pizza Wiki, and there's a lot of overlap within those styles. Today, we're going to teach you how to make three main types of pizza: New York, Chicago, and Neapolitan. Between these three, there's enough variety to ensure you'll never get sick of eating pizza pies (as if that were even remotely possible).

    New York Style

    People don't sit down in New York. They're either too busy or too afraid of the benches and seats on the subway. It's much safer to just stay standing. But even those who don't sit still have to eat from time to time. New York style pizza is designed for just a person. They come in huge slices that are thin enough to be folded in half and eaten like a sandwich; one hand holding your slice, the other hailing a cab or waving obscenities at the tourists. Now for making the pizza: Stretch the dough thin and circular, with the outside of the circle just a bit thicker to form your crust. Go light on the sauce. Ideally, just crush some tomatoes and season. For the cheese, go with a medium moisture mozzarella and sprinkle on some oregano and parmesan. Bake at 500ºF for around 9 minutes until your crust is golden brown and crispy.

    Chicago Style Deep Dish

    Where other pizza makers hide the sauce inside the pizza, Chicagoans put it right on top showing off the quality of the deep red tomatoes. This isn't a pizza to eat on the run. In fact, proper etiquette says you eat this one sitting down with a fork and knife. Here's how it's made: First you need to butter your crust. Sounds weird, but that's what makes it so flaky and delicious. Once both sides are buttered, load it into the deep dish. Then put a liberal layer of your cheese down, then pile the sauce on top of that. This one needs a bit of time in the oven to cook. 25 minutes at 425ºF and it should start to look done.

    Neapolitan Style

    The closest we have to the original flatbreads that came out of Naples is the neapolitan pizza. You can make it Marinara style (no cheese) or Margherita style (light cheese). To make these babies, you're going to want a nice thin crust (Remember, these were originally just baked, crisp flatbreads). Instead of sauce, this one will have olive oil and tomato chunks or no tomatoes at all. The highlight here are all the herbs and spices you can add; basil, oregano and garlic all tossed in extra virgin olive oil are what give it it's signature flavor.  




    Categories: Uncategorized  


    Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 11/13/2016

    Cooking vegetables from your own garden is a great experience. In the same way that you appreciate a meal made from scratch more than a frozen dinner or takeout, cooking food that you grew yourself is an extremely rewarding feeling. Aside from being delicious, growing your own food can help you save money, waste less food, consume less plastic packaging (helping the environment), and try out new recipes you normally wouldn't. When it comes to planting vegetables for cooking, however, there's more to it than simply tossing some seeds in your garden. Here's how to get the most out of growing your own vegetables for use on the dinner table.

    Plant smart

    One of the first mistakes beginner gardeners make is planting the wrong vegetables or the wrong proportions of vegetables. One or two squash plants, for example, will provide ample amounts of squash for most small families. So, think about the meals you love to cook and what vegetables they require. Then find out how much those plants yield. Some vegetables can be planted and harvested at many times throughout the growing season. If you eat lots of leafy greens (lettuce, spinach, kale, etc.), don't plant a huge row all at once. Instead, plant in intervals of two or three weeks so you can reap the rewards throughout the season. Similarly, many lettuces (such a romaine) are able to be continually harvested--that means there's no need for pulling the whole planet out of the ground and replanting.

    Plan your meals

    To get the most out of your garden plan a weekly menu that incorporates items from your garden. If your tomatoes look like they're ripening, plan for making tomato sauce, pizza, or caprese sandwiches the following week. Get creative with recipes. If you have a surplus of peppers, try different stuffed pepper recipes. The internet is your best friend when it comes to discovering new uses for surplus vegetables.

    Preserving

    A garden should be useful to you year-round, not just during the autumn harvest season. There are several methods of preserving your vegetables. The way you choose depends on your own need. Common means of preservation include:
    • Freezing meals. Remember those stuffed peppers? You don't have to eat them every day of the week once your peppers are ripe. Cook up some rice, beans, and sauce, stuff your peppers and bake. Eat however much you want and place the rest in airtight bags in the freezer. They'll make great lunches for when you're in a rush.
    • Blanching and steaming.  If you're not quite sure how you'll want to use your vegetables but you know you'll use them later blanching and steaming are great options. Boil or steam them for five minutes then toss them into a bucket of ice-water to cool. Once cool, drain them and freeze them in bags.
    • Canning.  This method takes some preparation and research but canning is a great way to save fruits and vegetables for use throughout the year and are great if you don't have extra space in your freezer for frozen vegetables.







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