RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 6/14/2020

Image by Bruno /Germany from Pixabay

To dress up your front porch, all you need are two tall flowerpots filled with gorgeous plants. Choosing an ideal combination of flowers, grasses and other plants is the key to creating the right aesthetic. To help you find the best mix, use this guide on the top six plants for front porch flowerpots.

Marigold

With their bright flowers and interesting foliage, marigolds instantly capture your gaze and fill your heart with cheer. Their flower looks a lot like a carnation but comes in rich yellow, orange and red tones.  You can find many different types, ranging from six inches to over two feet tall. The compact varieties work well in the middle of the pot while taller ones serve as a stunning backdrop for the other plants.

Fountain Grass

As indicated by its name, Fountain Grass features plumes of foliage that burst outward in an amazing display. At the top of each blade, the grass has a beautiful foxtail-like flower that blooms in late summer and remain through the fall months. This grass comes in green and purple varieties, both of which can reach nearly four feet tall. With its immense height, it works best along the back of the flowerpot.

Fuchsia

Fuchsias feature two-tone tropical flowers that hang from the branches like little bells. The dark green leaves frame the blooms, helping their colors pop even more. There are over 105 different types in all different shapes, sizes and colors. The most popular trailing varieties are used in hanging baskets and work well draped over the sides of your flowerpots. You can also select the bushier type as a vivid centerpiece.

Angelonia

Angelonia look a lot like Snapdragons, but bloom for many months longer to constantly fill the air with their delicious fruity scent. Their flowers come in a picturesque array of pinks, blues and purples, which stand out perfectly against the narrow green leaves. They reach nearly two feet in height, making them an excellent flower to put in the center of your pots.

Sweet Potato Vines

Grown for its breathtaking leaves, Sweet Potato Vines look incredible trailing down the sides of tall flowerpots. Depending on the variety you select, they have a wide range of leaf shapes. Some have heart-shaped foliage, while others look more like a maple leaf. There are even three lobed varieties that are a delight to gaze upon. This trailing plant happily grows down the side of the pot to create a waterfall of color all the way to the ground.

Coleus

Since they come in such a wide range of color combinations, Coleus is a really fun plant to grow. There are many different types on the market today, all featuring green, red and purple tones. The leaves are streaked, splashed and dotted with multiple colors in various intensities. They grow upright to over three feet in height, making them a perfect addition at the center or back of the pot.

No matter what plants you choose from your flowerpots, do a trial run before settling on your final arrangement. Fill the planters almost all the way up with soil, then place the plants inside without removing them from their nursery pots. After that, move them around until you are satisfied with the placement to find the perfect aesthetic.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 11/13/2016

Cooking vegetables from your own garden is a great experience. In the same way that you appreciate a meal made from scratch more than a frozen dinner or takeout, cooking food that you grew yourself is an extremely rewarding feeling. Aside from being delicious, growing your own food can help you save money, waste less food, consume less plastic packaging (helping the environment), and try out new recipes you normally wouldn't. When it comes to planting vegetables for cooking, however, there's more to it than simply tossing some seeds in your garden. Here's how to get the most out of growing your own vegetables for use on the dinner table.

Plant smart

One of the first mistakes beginner gardeners make is planting the wrong vegetables or the wrong proportions of vegetables. One or two squash plants, for example, will provide ample amounts of squash for most small families. So, think about the meals you love to cook and what vegetables they require. Then find out how much those plants yield. Some vegetablescan be planted and harvested at many times throughout the growing season. If you eat lots of leafy greens (lettuce, spinach, kale, etc.), don't plant a huge row all at once. Instead, plant in intervals of two or three weeks so you can reap the rewards throughout the season. Similarly, many lettuces (such a romaine) are able to be continually harvested--that means there's no need for pulling the whole planet out of the ground and replanting.

Plan your meals

To get the most out of your garden plan a weekly menu that incorporates items from your garden. If your tomatoes look like they're ripening, plan for making tomato sauce, pizza, or caprese sandwiches the following week. Get creative with recipes. If you have a surplus of peppers, try different stuffed pepper recipes. The internet is your best friend when it comes to discovering new uses for surplus vegetables.

Preserving

A garden should be useful to you year-round, not just during the autumn harvest season. There are several methods of preserving your vegetables. The way you choose depends on your own need. Common means of preservation include:
  • Freezing meals.Remember those stuffed peppers? You don't have to eat them every day of the week once your peppers are ripe. Cook up some rice, beans, and sauce, stuff your peppers and bake. Eat however much you want and place the rest in airtight bags in the freezer. They'll make great lunches for when you're in a rush.
  • Blanching and steaming. If you're not quite sure how you'll want to use your vegetables but you know you'll use them later blanching and steaming are great options. Boil or steam them for five minutes then toss them into a bucket of ice-water to cool. Once cool, drain them and freeze them in bags.
  • Canning.This method takes some preparation and research but canning is a great way to save fruits and vegetables for use throughout the year and are great if you don't have extra space in your freezer for frozen vegetables.





Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 9/29/2013

Old and dried out PointsetaAre you a plant killer? If so, don't feel discouraged. Many people looking to add a touch of green to their homes end up on the "most wanted" list. Luckily for them (and perhaps you as well), plant killing isn't a crime. Also, there are a few plants that can survive even the most neglectful of plant keepers. If you think that keeping houseplants healthy is out of your league, then give these hardy friends a chance to shine in your home. Air Plants - Also known as Epiphytes, these plants derive most, if not all of the moisture and nutrients they need from the air. They can be put almost anywhere in your home, and are virtually indestructible. These plants don't even need soil. At most, they'll need a light mist every few months. Succulents - These plants are known for their large, fleshy, unusual appearance. A common misconception about Succulents is that they are cacti. While it is true that most cacti are succulents, not all succulents are cacti. They are relatively cheap to purchase, and once rooted, can be a beautiful addition to your home. Given the abundance of varieties to choose from, odds are you'll be able to find a succulent that complements any home style. Aloe - Not only is aloe a succulent, it is one of only a few plants that can be kept for not only decorative purposes, but medicinal as well. The gel in aloe vera plants has been used for skin irritations, such as cuts and burns. The gel can also be processed into soaps. Jade - Jade is also a succulent, and can be a beautiful addition to your home. Many jade plants are purchased as bonsai trees, and upkeep is minimal. While not as hardy as the other plants on the list, this is a good plant to take a shot at after you've managed to keep a few air plants and hardier succulents alive. Golden Pothos - Not only is this plant incredibly hardy, it also qualifies as an "air scrubber", removing toxins from the air in your home. Trimmings can easily be cultivated into plants, and the rate of growth can be incredibly fast. Care should be taken to avoid ingestion by pets and children.







Tags