RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/9/2020

If you’re a health nut, where you live may be a big factor for you. The neighborhood that you choose could have some impact on your health and lifestyle choices. Your neighborhood will need the amenities that you crave like places for exercise, access to healthy food, and sidewalks for walking. These aspects also add to the community sense that you feel within the neighborhood. Children’s parks, people who go on frequent strolls, and a sense of people spending time outside often are all signs of a “healthy” neighborhood. Below, we’ll delve into these key factors. 


Sidewalks And Bike Trails


Being able to do daily errands on foot along with access to easy outdoor exercise is important to a healthy lifestyle. These amenities provide safety and the ability to access what you need without a car. You can even find public transportation easier to get to and from. As a bonus, you’ll be doing something good for the environment, saving gas and staying out of traffic.  


Nature Is Abundant


Don’t underestimate how much healthier being around nature can make you feel. From lush trees, to parks, gardens, hiking trails, even golf courses all provide access to active activities and natural beauty. Even community gardens are a part of nature that can be good for your health. Having the opportunity to grow or even be around the inspiration of people growing and caring for their own food sources is good for you. The more access you have to nature in the place that you’re living, the healthier that you’ll be.  


Check Out The Social Scene


Sometimes you can get a sense of a neighborhood just by observing it. Are people making connections and out and about together, or do people seem to go off more on their own? Socializing is an important part of health and well-being. Some signs of socially friendly neighborhoods:


  • People are out walking their dogs, chatting
  • Neighbors are out together gathering in a front yard



Gyms And Healthy Food Are Readily Available


Do you see your favorite organic grocery store nearby? Having access to the type and quality of food you crave is important. Maybe there is an abundance of vegetarian and vegan restaurant options nearby. For those days that a workout outside just won’t do, having a gym close by is also a sign of a healthy neighborhood.    

 

Check Out The Traffic


A neighborhood can have all of the above, yet if it has a lot of traffic, you could have a huge issue. Lots of traffic brings two different kinds of pollution- noise and air. Not having access to quiet spaces can often increase stress levels. If you have allergies or asthma, being around a lot of traffic pollution may not help your condition much either. While traffic seems like a small detail, it’s something to consider when you’re looking for a healthy neighborhood.




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Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 4/21/2019

So, you figured out what your ideal home looks like. Now it’s time to determine where this home is? Are you looking for a place in the same neighborhood you already live? Did you take a transfer or new jobs that are moving you to a new city? Determining the features, you seek in the area around your home is just as important as the home itself. Here’s how to create an ideal neighborhood checklist to go along with your dream home. 

Neighborhood/City Features

General location. 

Where to do you want to live? Do you prefer to be downtown or in an active city neighborhood among all the hustle and bustle? Are you ready to move out of the city and to a more suburban community with the kids? Is it your desire to be out in the country with lots of land and sky? Think about your ideal location and then work backward taking your current lifestyle and needs into account. You might want to live way out in the boonies, but you work in downtown five days a week. Are you comfortable adding a longer commute to your daily routine? Maybe adding a commute so you can enjoy your large property on the weekends is a priority. Or, you might consider finding a community with larger lot sizes and lots of greenery that gives you a feeling of privacy and country life while staying within a reasonable radius of your workplace. 

Community

  • What does your ideal community look like? Do you even want to live in a close community? For families, a gated or private community might be perfect. These tend to come with added amenities like rec centers, shared pools, and picnic areas. On the other hand, you might be dying to raise a horse and want to move out to more acreage that gives you room to roam. Some people like the look of an eclectic community where each house is designed completely different and your block reflects the personality of each owner. Still, others like the more consistent style of a development where you select certain features, but there is an overall cohesiveness to the neighborhood.
  • What is it like to live in the community? If you’re an active, outdoorsy person, but you want to stay close to downtown, try looking for a neighborhood near greenbelts, parks, and other outdoor areas. If you desire for your kids to run around free out front without worry? Look for a community with similar families, a neighborhood watch program and a communal living style. Does your neighborhood need to have an easily accessible gym, library, lots of restaurants and nightlife or great built-in opportunities for networking? Do you want to keep your kids in the same school district, move to the best possible school for their interests and needs or enroll them in a new private school? These are all factors to consider when searching for your home. 

Take your ideal home and neighborhood checklists to your agent. Work with them to review your desires and budget to figure out the best compromises to have the best realistic outcome to your home search. Your local agent knows your area and can offer the best wisdom to help you check as many items off the list as possible.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/11/2018

???Robert Frost's poem, Mending Wall, poses an interesting question about whether "good fences make good neighbors."

On one hand, there are several advantages to having your property surrounded by a fence, especially if you or your neighbors have dogs or small children running around.

If you happen to have a vegetable garden or fruit trees in your backyard, a well-constructed fence can also help keep out ravenous deer, rabbits, raccoons, skunks, foxes, and other wildlife.

There's no doubt that fences can serve a variety of useful purposes, ranging from privacy and safety to wildlife control and home security. While it can be beneficial to mark off your property boundaries and keep your backyard private, a question to consider is whether a large fence -- especially a new one -- sends the wrong message to your neighbors.  Striking the perfect balance between privacy and friendly neighbor relations can be tricky at times, but there are compelling reasons to stay on good terms.

  1. Security reasons: If you take the time to chat with your neighbors every now and then, they'll have more of a tendency to keep an eye on your property when you're on vacation or just away for the day -- especially if you ask them.  People tend to be more helpful, observant, and protective of others with whom they share a bond or have a sense of community. In contrast to that, if they don't even know your name and haven't exchanged more than a few words with you in years, they'll be less inclined to pay attention to who's on your property and whether they belong there or not.
  2. Sharing resources: Keeping the lines of communication open with your neighbors is beneficial on many levels. When you have a friendly, ongoing relationship, you won't feel reluctant to ask them for help when your car battery's dead and you're running late for work. Trusted neighbors can also provide you with valuable information, such the names of dependable home improvement contractors or how to arrange a free pickup of household clutter that you want to donate to the Salvation Army.
  3. Quality of life: When you're regularly greeted by friendly neighbors, your neighborhood will feel like more of a welcoming and upbeat place to live. It may be necessary for you to set the example or make the first move, but once a friendly atmosphere has been created in a neighborhood, it's relatively easy to keep it going.

So while you may not want your neighbors to get in the habit of stopping by your home to chew the fat, every day, it can be worth your while to greet them by name, offer help whenever possible, and be the kind of good neighbor you'd like them to be. Setting a positive example may be all that's needed to establish a cooperative relationship and possibly even a life-long friendship. And, if all else fails, keep in mind the words of Benjamin Franklin: "Love thy neighbor, but don't pull down your hedge!"







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