RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 6/7/2020

Whether you’re a first time homebuyer or a seasoned homeowner, the terminology of mortgages can be confusing. Since buying a home is such a huge financial decision, you’re also going to want to make sure you understand every step of the process and all of the conditions and fees along the way.

In this article, we’re going to explain some of the common terms you might come across when applying for a home loan, be it online or over the phone. By learning the basic meaning of these terms you’ll feel more confident and prepared going into the application process.

We’ll cover the acronyms, like APRs and ARMs, and the scary sounding terms like “amortization” so that you know everything you need to about the terminology of home loans.

  • ARM and FRM, or adjustable rate vs fixed rate mortgages. Lenders make their money by charging you interest on your home loan that you pay back over the length of your loan period. Adjustable rate mortgages or ARMs are loans that have interest rates which change over the lifespan of your loan. You may start off at a low, “introductory rate” and later start paying higher amounts depending on the predetermined rate index. Fixed rate mortgages, on the other hand, remain at the same rate throughout the life of the loan. However, refinancing on your loan allows you to receive a different interest rate later down the road.

  • Amortization. It sounds like a medieval torture technique, but in reality amortization is the process of making your life easier by setting up a fixed repayment schedule. This schedule includes both the interest and the principal loan balance, allowing you to understand how long and how much money will go toward repaying your mortgage.

  • Equity. Simply state, your equity is the the amount of the home you have paid off. In a sense, it’s the amount of the home that you really own. Your equity increases as you make payments, and having equity can help you buy a new home, or see a return on investment with your current home if the home increases in value.

  • Assumption and assumability. It isn’t the title of a Jane Austen novel. It’s all about the process of a mortgage changing hands. An assumable mortgage can be transferred to a new buyer, and assumption is the actual transfer of the loan. Assuming a loan can be financially beneficial if the home as increased in value since the mortgage was created.

  • Escrow. There are a lot of legal implications that come along with buying a home. An escrow is designed to make sure the loan process runs smoothly. It acts as a holding tank for your documents, payments, as well as property taxes and insurance. An escrow performs an important function in the home buying process, and, as a result, charges you a percentage of the home for its services.

  • Origination fee. Basically a fancy way of saying “processing fee,” the origination covers the cost of processing your mortgage application. It’s one of the many “closing costs” you’ll encounter when buying a home and accounts for all of the legwork your loan officer does to make your mortgage a reality--running credit reports, reviewing income history, and so on.  




Tags: mortgage   terminology  
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Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 12/8/2019

Preparing to buy a home is a long and stressful process for many. You’ve spent months, or even years, saving for a down payment, planning your future, and building your credit to ensure you get the best possible interest rate on your loan.

Then you find out, when getting preapproved for a mortgage, that your credit score dropped by a few points. So, what gives?

There’s a lot to understand about how credit scores affect mortgages and vice versa. In today’s post, I’m going to attempt to cover everything you need to know about how applying for a mortgage can affect your credit score so you’ll be prepared when it comes time to buy a home.

Prequalification, preapproval, and credit checks

There are a lot of misconceptions about what it means to be preapproved or prequalified for a loan. Some of it is due to the jargon that is used in real estate transactions, and some of it is just a marketing technique on the part of lenders.

So, what does it mean to be prequalified and preapproved?

The short version is that getting prequalified is a quick and easy process to determine whether you’re eligible to lend to and how much you’re likely to receive. It involves a quick review of your finances, and often includes either a self-reported or soft credit inquiry.

A “soft inquiry” is the type of credit check that employers typically use for a background check. It doesn’t affect your credit score, as you are not applying to open a new line of credit. In fact, many lenders’ process for prequalification is a simple online form that doesn’t even require a credit check. We’ll talk more about the difference between soft inquiries and hard inquiries later.

The simplicity of prequalification makes it a simple and easy way to get started. But, it isn’t always accurate in how well it predicts the type of mortgage and loan amount you can receive. That’s where preapproval comes in.

When you get preapproved for a loan you fill out an official application (you often have to pay for these). This will request documentation for your finances and assets, and will ask your approval to run a detailed credit report.


These credit reports are considered “hard inquiries” and are a vital step in getting approved or preapproved for a mortgage. However, they also, at least temporarily, lower your credit score.

Why hard inquiries lower your credit score

When any creditor, be it a bank or credit card company, is determining whether to lend to you, they want to know that you are a safe investment. To determine this, they want to know how frequently you pay your bills on time, how much you owe to other creditors, and how financially stable you are right now.

When you make multiple inquiries in a short period of time, it’s a red flag to lenders that you might be in trouble financially. Thus, hard inquiries will lower your credit score for 1 to 2 months.

Applying to multiple lenders: the silver lining

When borrowers apply for a mortgage, they often shop around and apply to multiple lenders. While it may seem that all of these hard inquiries will add up and drastically lower their credit score, this isn’t the case.

Credit bureaus take into account the source of the inquiries. If they realize that you are applying for mortgages, they will typically recognize this as rate shopping and group these applications together on your credit report, counting them only as a single inquiry. This means your score shouldn’t drop multiple times for multiple mortgage preapprovals that were made within a small time frame.

Now that you know more about how mortgage applications affect your credit score, you can confidently shop around for the best mortgage for you and your family.




Tags: mortgage   credit score  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 11/3/2019

There are different kinds of mortgages available to prospective homeowners today. The right mortgage for you will depend on a number of factors, including your level of income and credit rating. While there are numerous mortgage products available to buyers today, they will mostly fall under the categories below:

FHA-Backed loans

Most folks getting a home for the first time will purchase it with the help of a Federal Housing Administration loan. Introduced back in the 1930s after the Great Depression, these loans are insured by the government and hence come with attractively low-interest rates. Since the government backs them, even folks with a bad credit score can confidently apply for FHA loans. If you can't raise all of the down payment the seller is asking for, an FHA loan is ideal. 

VA loans

This kind of loan was established by the US Department of Veteran Affairs to enable former members of the nation’s armed forces to buy homes. You can also access this type of mortgage if you’re the spouse of a deceased veteran. Those who fit under this category can get a mortgage even without a down payment. 

Fixed-rate mortgage

If you want to buy a house to stay in for the long haul, a fixed-rate mortgage is a good idea. With this type of loan, the interest rate will remain fixed for the duration of the mortgage. If economists are projecting a rise in interest rates, you can cushion yourself from higher repayments with a fixed-rate mortgage. The predictability of this type of mortgage is ideal for planning since the payment consistency makes it easy to budget your paycheck. While this protects you if the interest index rises, you won’t benefit if there is a fall in the interest index. 

Adjustable rate mortgage

If you’re confident that interest rates will decline soon, this kind of mortgage will help you take advantage of that trend. Should the interest rate dip, you can expect your monthly repayments to reduce accordingly. 

Despite the name, the interest on the mortgage is usually not flexible for the duration of the loan. The loan starts with a period of fixed interest followed by a period where it becomes adjustable. Such an arrangement will work well for you if you intend to sell the house before the end of that initial period.

Find out the kind of loan you qualify for and see if you can push for better terms. Not sure where to apply? Ask your real estate agent about their recommended lenders.




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Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 9/29/2019

With so much to think about these days, it is not surprising that some first-time home buyers make mistakes they later regret as they shop for a home for sale. Presented here are some of the most popular mistakes, along with tips to help you avoid a similar fate.

Looking for a home before getting a mortgage

Many first-time buyers make the mistake of seeing houses first before ever scheduling an appointment with a lending institution. In some big markets, housing inventory is still tight, and competition is so frightening. You might discover that you are eager to spend more to buy a property, or lose a property because you are not even pre-approved for a mortgage.

What is the solution to this? 

Before you fall in love with that perfect dream house you have been looking at all this while, ensure you get a complete underwritten pre-approval letter. Being pre-approved sends the signal that you are a serious buyer whose credit and finances are ready to get a loan successfully.

Buying a house that your financial muscle cannot carry

It’s easy to fall in love with houses that might make you spend more, but over-stretching yourself can cause you regrets later. It could even put you at higher risk of losing your home if you fall on the unpleasant hammer of hard financial times.

Any remedy? 

The best way to overcome this issue is to concentrate on the monthly expenses you can genuinely afford instead of looking at the highest loan amount you qualify for. Just because you are eligible for a $250,000 loan, that doesn’t mean you can afford the monthly payments that come with it. Factor in your other financial obligations that do not show on a credit report along with additional home expenses like insurance and taxes when deciding on how much house you can afford.

Emptying your savings just to buy a house

One of the biggest mistakes you can make is spending every dime you have. When you invest all your cash, including your savings on the down payment and closing costs, you set yourself up for disappointment. It will do you no good.

Some people make the mistake of spending all they have saved to make the required 20% down payment, so they don’t have to pay for mortgage insurance. However, they are making a grave mistake as they are left with no savings at all.

Homebuyers who pay 20 percent or more down do not have to pay for mortgage insurance when getting a conventional mortgage. That often translates into significant savings on the monthly mortgage payment. However, it is not worth the risk of living on the edge.

Here comes the solution.Let your aim be to save three to six months of living expenses in an emergency fund. Paying mortgage insurance is not the best, but killing your emergency or retirement savings just to make a sizeable down payment is even more of risk.

Talk to your real estate agent about their mortgage and lender recommendations and get yourself pre-approved for a realistic mortgage before starting your home search.




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Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 9/1/2019

For many individuals, the homebuying journey often begins with getting pre-approved for a mortgage. Because if a buyer has a mortgage, he or she can enter the real estate market with a budget in hand.

Ultimately, there are many signs that now may be the perfect time to apply for a mortgage, and these include:

1. You're ready to upgrade from an apartment to a home.

If you're tired of paying monthly rent for an apartment, purchasing a house offers a viable alternative. And if you get pre-approved for a mortgage, you can move one step closer to moving from an apartment to a house.

In most instances, a home offers a significant upgrade over an apartment. Many residences are available in cities and towns nationwide that offer more space than apartments. Plus, as a homeowner, you won't have to worry about dealing with a landlord.

2. You feel good about your credit score.

If you have a strong credit score, you likely are a great candidate for a mortgage. In fact, you may be better equipped than others to get a favorable interest rate on the mortgage of your choice.

Understanding your credit score is a key part of the homebuying journey. You can request a free copy of your credit report annually from each of the three credit reporting bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion). Then, once you find out your credit score, you can determine whether you are in good shape to pursue a mortgage.

3. A buyer's market is in place.

In a buyer's market, there usually is an abundance of top-notch houses and a shortage of buyers. This means a homebuyer may be able to get a wonderful deal on a house, especially if he or she performs a comprehensive house search.

To find out whether a buyer's market is in place, you should check out the prices of recently sold houses in your area. Also, you may want to find out how long recently sold houses were listed before they sold. By reviewing this housing market data, you can differentiate a buyer's market from a seller's market and decide whether now is the right time to apply for a mortgage.

If you're interested in getting a mortgage and starting a house search, you may want to hire a real estate agent too. Because if you have a real estate agent at your side, you can receive extensive support at each stage of the property buying journey.

A real estate agent will teach you everything you need to know about pursuing a house. He or she will offer insights into the local housing market and ensure that you can conduct a successful house search. And if you ever have concerns or questions along the way, a real estate agent is ready to respond to them.

Want to launch a home search? Get pre-approved for a mortgage, and you can take the first step to acquire your ideal residence.




Tags: Buying a home   mortgage  
Categories: Uncategorized  




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