RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 4/7/2019

Here are some secret places where dirt and germs accumulate.

Kitchen - The Sponge 

Even though we take time to clean the sink and worktop, there is something that often escapes our routine cleaning... the kitchen sponge. 

How to take care of it?

Opt for sponges that are good quality, dependable, and wash with hot water. The hot water helps kill some germs and makes your cleaning more effective. Flap the sponge well when you're done using it every day to avoid humidity in which the bacteria reproduce.

Living room– Remote Control

One never thinks of cleaning it, yet everyone fiddles with it, makes it fall to the ground; it passes in the hands full of crumbs of chips, under the soles of the slippers; not to mention the times when we sit on it by mistake or those where the dog drool over it.

How to clean it?

Spray a little liquid soap on a cotton swab and clean carefully between the keys.

Bathroom - The toilet seat

The toilet seat sometimes does not get all the cleaning it deserves.

How to clean them?

Washing your toilet set once a week won't suffice. You must do it every day or at least three times a week. The lid is flipped before flushing to prevent the movement of water from causing the bacteria to fly.

Doorknob

Doorknobs can be one of the dirtiest places in the house especially that of washrooms and the ones facing outdoors.

How to clean one?

80% of infectious diseases spread by hands. Think about putting a disinfectant bottle near the door at the entrance and outside your washroom to ensure that the hands that hold the doorknobs are clean and do not transfer any germs.

Bath Mat 

Sometimes you wash the towels and bath and remember to clean the shower. Most times, the bath mat goes scot-free in the middle of household chores. However, it must be washed and changed at least as much as towels or more: because it stays on the ground, wet, and is used by several people. 

How to wash it?

You need to, first of all, stop taking shoes into the bathrooms and also ensure that you clean the bath mat often enough. You should also ensure that your floor mat stays dry as much as possible.

Pay attention to these areas to keep your home clean. Pay extra attention to these areas when cleaning your home for inspection or an open house.




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Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 1/20/2019

Do you live in a house that has hard water? You know, where you get those white rings on the counters and the faucets have this grungy, crusty build up. While you’re at the DIY store, you see this free water testing kit and decide its time to learn what is going on. You get the results, and the company asks to come out and give you a further evaluation as well as introduce you to a solution. The time this takes is well worth the process because it gives you valuable information about your water and how to fix it. Unfortunately, the typical solution is a $6,000 to $8,000 fix. Now maybe that is in your budget, and that is great, but most of the time that solution still involves the use of salt.

There is another way 

Alternatives exist where the installation cost may be way less—although it might be the same depending on how large of a system you get. But more importantly, it is a solution that doesn’t involve the constant purchase of salt. 

A recent addition to the water treatment lineup includes many different brands on salt-free water conditioners or de-scalers. Typically, a non-salt system consists of a large particle filter and a multiple-part canister. The system works by neutralizing minerals such as magnesium and calcium by changing their ionic makeup so that these minerals do not stick to pipes and other surfaces. They do remain in the water, though, so if you allow a pool of water to dry, the minerals will form a powdery residue that easily brushes off.

DIY Installation?

Installation is not complicated, but if you have little to no experience plumbing, you should hire a local plumber or certified installer to do the project. It is essential to put it in-line with the water going the correct direction (into the water heater, for example), so you’ll need to know which way the pipe is flowing where you add the joint.

Does it work?

The results are different from a water softener. You’ll see a reduction of the calcium in the water. Your skin will feel less dried out, and dish soap will create larger amounts of suds. You will not have that slippery feel of salt-softened water though. Most importantly, you can drink the water and water your plants with the water directly from the tap. 

Is it green?

The environment gains because there is no back-washing of the system like with traditional salt-based softeners, so you are not dumping salt water into the drainage system, and you are not using a bunch of extra water. 

What does it cost to maintain?

The cost to operate it once it after installation is very low. There is no salt to purchase every month. You only have to change the large particle filter every 6 to 12 months, depending on your water source. You may even receive extra filters with your installation, so check with the dealer.

The cost to DIY the project includes the purchase of the system and a few fittings to make the connection into your water pipes. Check with your real estate professional to see if adding a water conditioner system will increase the value of your home for resale.




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Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/18/2018

If you have driven around any American neighborhood lately, you may have noticed a big addition to many houses, particularly if you look up. Solar panels have been soaring in popularity the past few years. As of 2015, 784,000 U.S. homes and businesses have gone solar, according to Solar Industry Data. So what is driving all of these home and business owners to go solar? For one, the world’s recent consciousness of the environment, and the upswing of renewable energy sources has certainly had a big impact and can be seen more in mainstream media and advertising (i.e. the hybrid car). But solar companies and the government are making solar panels even more appealing with incentives, and with the promise of savings. Homeowners who utilize solar energy save thousands on their energy bill every year. There are many incentives that could also aid in saving money. As of 2015, the government offers a 30% Federal Tax Credit for homeowners who add solar panels to their homes. Many states have their own programs that reward anyone for going green. For example, Massachusetts has a program called the RPS Solar Carve-Out II, which is an incentive to support residential, commercial, public, and nonprofit entities in developing new solar installations across the state. Massachusetts and New Hampshire offer Energy Certificate programs which allow homeowners to sell their solar energy, generating many dollars in tax-free income. Because of these incentives, and also the quick payback, solar panels can be a sound investment. Most homeowners can be revived from their investments within 10 years. You can compare that to any other utility upgrade, such as an air conditioner, which costs money to install, and then more money to run. For anyone thinking about moving soon, solar panels will actually increase the value of a home. According to a study done by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), homes sell 20% faster when solar panels are installed. Since solar energy seems to be an upward trend, it could be appealing to the housing market. Solar panels are also a guaranteed performance. Because solar panels create energy from the sun’s rays, it will never run out. Compare that assurance to the unreliability and fluctuation of other non-renewable utility companies. As for maintenance, solar energy requires little to no upkeep for the homeowner. Once it is installed, there is nothing to do but soak up the sun! Aside from being a trendy look for homes, there are many benefits to adding solar panels to your home. All else aside, decreasing your carbon footprint can be a sunny incentive for all of us.







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