RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 3/28/2021

Photo by Brett Hondow via Pixabay

You love your tiles. But they don't seem to do your bathroom justice anymore. Ask yourself, is it the tiles themselves, or what's in between that makes you cringe? Is the grout cracked, faded, yellowish or gray? 

Breathe new life into a dirty-looking bathroom tile floor, kitchen backsplash or tile shower by simply re-grouting the tiles and polishing them. Here's how to do it.

What you'll need

  • Margin float
  • Earplugs (if you're using a rotary. It's loud!)
  • Two sponges
  • Safety glasses
  • Two buckets
  • Manual grout removal tool with a carbide blade 
  • Rotary tool or reciprocating saw (not needed for small jobs)
  • Grout
  • One cup vinegar (for polishing)

Step 1: choose the right tool for the job

A rotary tool or reciprocating saw is faster. But you'll have to be extra careful not to damage a tile. And if you don't have a rotary tool, you'll need to buy or borrow. For these reasons, generally, you'll only want to go to this option if you have a larger space to re-grout like a master bathroom. 

On the other hand, removing grout manually can be tedious and slow at times. *Pro tip* For smaller jobs, start with a manual tool. You can always switch to a power tool if you find you don't have the patience.

Step 2: remove the existing grout

Start by putting on your safety glasses and ear protection if using a power tool. Whether using a manual tool or electric, slowly guide your instrument through the in-between, cutting out the grout. *Pro tip* Start in a less seen area of the room like behind the door or toilet. That way, if you do make a mistake (break a tile) when learning how to use the tool, it's less of a deal-breaker, and you won't feel you must replace the tile.

Step 3: mix & apply the grout




Tags: DIY   tile   grout  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/28/2021


Nothing completes an open floor plan better than open shelving. Open shelves present everything for the world to see. They transform what may be a cluttered, dark, hidden space into one that becomes a place of not only function but of style. 

Open shelving complements the Minimalist, Industrial or Scandinavian Modern styles. But depending on how you arrange on those shelves, it can also work with those who love something more cozy like Rural or French Country. 

On the other hand, open shelving isn't for everyone. Some prefer the convenience and privacy of tucking items away behind closed doors. They feel less need to continually ensure everything looks beautiful on those shelves. And if you live in an arid climate, doors protect dishes, cans and boxes of pasta from the dust that tends to settle.

Doors vs. shelving? That's the question you'll need to ask yourself before making a change. But if you're ready to transform your cabinets to open shelving, here's how it's done.

Clear Your Cabinets

Get everything out of the way. That includes removing those doors, which should simply require a screwdriver. Already, you'll begin to see your open shelves taking shape.

Fill Any Holes

You won't need them since you're not replacing the doors. Fill any holes with wood filler. If these look uneven, hand sand them. But paint will cover up most of the imperfection.

Remove Center Braces

A cabinet with more than one door will likely have a piece of wood where the two doors come together. You don't need it. Remove it with a saw and hammer. 

If you find any nails or staples left behind, you may need to pry them. But sometimes you'll find they've been driven in too far. If there's nothing that the claws of a hammer can grasp, force the nail back through the wood. It should only take some careful whacks to the sharp side with your hammer. 

Paint Your Shelves

You choose the color. But why stick with one? Open shelves are the perfect opportunity to add contrast. Try painting the inside a dark color like navy, black, dark gray or red. Then paint the outside a complementing light color, pale gray or white. 

Whatever you do, don't forget to seal the paint with a polyacrylic. It reduces the risk of water damage and strengthens the paint so that it's less likely to chip or fade.

Let It Dry & Organize

Don't place anything on the shelves for at least 48 hours. But once that timer dings, you're ready to assemble. If you have more dishes than you can presentably place on the shelves, ask yourself if you need them. Less is more on open shelving.

We hope you enjoy your new open shelving. To learn more about home maintenance and design, follow our blog.




Tags: kitchen   home improvement   DIY  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 7/12/2020


 Photo by Prawny via Pixabay

Circa 1965, having beautiful wood paneling was the envy of the neighborhood. It was like bringing the outdoors in. But 50-60 years later, it usually just makes a room seem dark and dated unless you live in a log cabin. In most cases, you can remove the paneling and paint the drywall underneath. Here's what you'll do.

What you'll need

  • Primer
  • Brushes
  • Paint rollers 
  • Painter's tape
  • Plastic floor protection
  • Paint pan
  • Putty knife
  • Spackling paste for nail holes
  • Safety goggles
  • Screwdriver
  • Flashlight
  • Pry bar
  • Hand sander

Step one: make sure there's drywall under there

Some home builders simply hung the panels directly onto the studs. Others hung drywall first. Then they nailed the paneling over it. Before you begin this project, you need to know what you have. 

*Pro tip* Find out if you have drywall by removing the outlet and light switch covers. Then peer into the wall with your flashlight. You should be able to see the rough edges of drywall in there. If not, don't proceed unless you also want to hang the drywall. It's not that hard. But it's a two-person, multiple weekend job for the average DIYer. We want you to know what you're getting into. If this is more than you feel comfortable with, contact a professional.

Step two: remove the paneling

Put on your safety goggles. Insulation, nails or a piece of wood could go flying during this job.

Next, use a pry bar to remove any molding or trim, carefully if you plan to reuse it. Now, you'll see the edges of the panel. Pry it off panel by panel. It will be nailed into the studs, so you'll need to put some upper body strength into it. Break boards to get it off the wall. But try to keep the drywall underneath as undamaged as possible.

Step three: repair the drywall

You'll definitely have nail holes to fill after removing the paneling. You may also have small gouges. They are easy to fix. And you'll need to do that to have a smooth painting surface.

Apply spackle to the holes with your putty knife. Then allow them to dry before sanding the surface smooth. You may need a second coat. But know it doesn't have to be perfect. That's what primer is for.

Step four: prime the wall

Primer helps fill small imperfections and smooth the painting surface in preparation for painting the wall. Lay down your plastic and apply painter's tape where needed. Then roll your wall with primer. Use the paintbrush to get corners and crevices that a roller won't reach. 

*Pro tip* If you take a break, put the end of your roller and paintbrush in a large freezer bag and seal it as well with tape or a rubber band. If the primer or paint dries on the brush, you may have to replace it. That's an extra expense you can avoid.

Let the primer dry on the wall. Then use your flashlight to see if there are any thin spots. Apply more, as needed.

And you're all ready to choose your paint color. Goodbye, paneling. Hello, 21st Century. For more home projects to update and improve your home, follow our blog.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 3/15/2020


 Photo by Nick Magwood via Pixabay

There's nothing more annoying than a cabinet door in the kitchen or bathroom that won't close properly. It squeaks. It catches. Plus it makes the space look less "put together" no matter how clean it otherwise is. Ignoring a door that won't close correctly, can do damage to the hinge or door. That creates a more significant home project. But fear not, below we'll show you four simple fixes to get your cabinet door working as it should.

What you'll need:

The tools you'll need vary, depending on what's wrong with your door. So identify the fix needed below before spending money on these items:

  • A screwdriver
  • New hinges 
  • Level
  • Epoxy
  • Drill with a small drill bit

Fix one: tighten the hinge screws

Sometimes the simplest solution is the right one. Cabinet doors that see a lot of use may jostle their screws loose over time. If the screws are loose, tighten them with a screwdriver. Do this sooner rather than later because allowing loose screws to remain loose will damage hinges and possibly the door over time.

Fix two: move the hinge

If your cabinet door never closed correctly, chances are it wasn't installed correctly. But fortunately, you can fix this too by moving the hinge to a new location. 

Start by unscrewing the problematic hinge. Then fill the holes with epoxy. This will harden and prevent the new screw holes from running into the old ones.

Determine where the hinge needs to be and place it there. Then mark holes with a pencil through the holes. Now, it's just a matter of drilling some new holes and screwing the hinge in.

*Pro tip* If you need to adjust the holes on the door itself, be careful not to drill all the way through.

Fix three: adjust the hinges

Some hinges are adjustable. This allows the hinge to fit into a recess or self-close the door. But these hinges can get off track. The door may then lean down slightly and not close well.

In this case, you'll need to adjust the cabinet door so that it is the same distance from the cabinet at both hinges. Then make sure the door is level. Now, tighten the screws on the hinges to hold the hinge and door in that position.

Fix four: replace the hinges

When you inspect the door, you may find that the hinge is warped. You may be able to hammer it out. But more likely, you'll want to replace it with a new hinge instead. Unscrew the existing hinge and screw a new one into the existing holes.

That door works as good as new. For more simple DIY home projects that can make a huge difference in how you live in and love your home, follow our blog.

 




Tags: Home Repair   DIY   cabinets  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/16/2020


 Photo by Jay Mantri via Pixabay

A deck adds valuable outdoor living space to your home's square footage, but to be an asset, it needs to be well-maintained. If your deck has missed a few annual cleanings or is showing popped nails, splintered boards or water damage, consider resurfacing it instead of replacing it. The money you save will be significant. Here's how:

Inspect Your Existing Deck

Look for rot, termite damage, warped or weakened boards and missing screws. Fix any problems you find by replacing individual boards and railings with similar materials. Make sure everything is structurally sound and sanded smooth before moving forward with the next step. 

Choose the Right Deck Wash

Step two involves giving your deck a good scrubbing to remove all traces of algae, dirt, mildew or mold that may have formed. You'll need a good wire broom or brush, eye protection and waterproof gloves, because some deck wash can be damaging to skin. You'll want to protect any nearby plants as well. Cover them in plastic while washing down your deck. 

Deck wash can be painted on, sprayed on with a garden hose, or applied with a pressure washer. A simple mixture of laundry detergent, bleach and warm water may be all it takes to begin bringing your deck back to life. Once applied, work the cleaning solution into the wood using your brush or broom. Rinse clean and allow the wood to dry before proceeding to the next step in resurfacing your existing deck. 

Apply Deck Stain

Lastly, you'll need to re-stain to apply a protective coating to your freshly cleaned decking. For older wood that still shows imperfections, try using a semi-transparent stain, instead of something that's clear. This will help to hide flaws and resistant stains.

You can spray, roll or brush the stain onto the deck, or you can use a combination of techniques such as spraying the stain down, then using a brush or roller to even out puddles and to trim out around railings. Apply the stain evenly, and then add the second and third coats while the stain is still damp. This helps keep old, thirsty wood from absorbing all the stain. Once applied, you'll need to re-stain your deck every other year to keep it looking its best. 

The total cost to replace your old deck can run upwards of $10,000, says ProRemodeler. Compare that with the $4,000 you might spend to replace worn boards and connectors, and you're looking at a significant savings. If your existing deck is worth repairing, that's usually the better option. But it must be structurally sound by the time the work is done. If you're unsure, call in a pro for an inspection. 







Tags