RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/21/2021

Photo by Rafa Bordes via Pixabay
 

Real estate closings could be quite simple at one end of the spectrum or very difficult at the other end. In most cases, you will need to understand the legal ramifications of signing several documents, including the note, mortgage, transfer of title, mineral rights, title insurance and tax documents. If your closing is complicated, you should always have an attorney present.

Simple Closings

It is very rare to have a simple closing, but it could happen. If you are buying raw land for cash, the closing is usually quite simple for the buyer and seller. You don’t need a mortgage, but you will need title insurance for yourself. You’ll also need a deed. The seller will need to sign the requisite tax documents.

Another simple closing is when you purchase a manufactured or modular home and put it on land that you already own. The closing, even with a mortgage, is easy and between the buyer and home manufacturer. However, if you need a construction loan while the home is being built and/or set up, the closing becomes more complicated since you must close twice. The first closing is the construction loan on the money you borrow for the home. The second loan is the loan that covers the finished product. Closing with a builder of a home that is built on-site is more complicated than closing on a manufactured or modular home.

Closings Gone Wrong

While no one wants to have a closing go wrong, it does happen. Your lawyer might find mistakes in documents, including the loan estimate. You might find that the seller did not disclose pertinent information about the home – information that would have prevented you from making an offer on a home and could be cause to break the contract without prejudice. It is always better to have a real estate lawyer review the documents prior to closing and at the closing to ensure that your best interests are met.

List of Closing Documents

At the closing, you will have to review and sign most of these documents:

  • Closing disclosure that dictates the terms of your loan and the closing costs you will pay.

  • Your loan application. You must sign a new copy of the application you submitted to the mortgage company, so be sure to review it and make sure everything is correct.

  • The mortgage note that binds you to repay the loan should have the amount you borrowed, the interest rate, payment date, the amount you will pay over the life of the loan, the length of the loan and other information.

  • The mortgage or deed of trust is what provides security for the loan. When you sign this document, you are putting your house up as collateral. If you bought land separately, the lender might also use the land as collateral.

  • The title and/or deed to your home. The deed is proof of ownership.

  • Affidavits, depending on your situation.

  • Escrow disclosure that tells you how much of your payment goes to escrow and what the escrow is used for. It is usually for county taxes and homeowner’s insurance.

  • Property transfer tax documents.

When scheduling your closing, even if your real estate agent is using a closing agent, consider having your own attorney present. It could save you a lot of headaches and heartache if the lawyer catches something amiss with the closing. 




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Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 1/17/2021

If youíre a first-time homebuyer, you might be wondering what all of the expenses you can expect to have when it comes time to close on your home.

Ideally, youíll want to understand all of the closing costs months in advance so that you can plan accordingly. However, even if youíre close to purchasing your first home, itís still useful to get to know closing costs better.

In todayís post, Iím going to cover the closing costs that are typically the buyerís responsibility.

Buyerís closing costs

Thereís good news and bad news when it comes to closing costs for buyers. The bad news is that buyers are typically on the hook for the majority of the closing costs associated with a real estate transaction. The good news, however, is that many of these fees will be grouped together as part of your mortgage, meaning you wonít have to devote much time or thought to them individually.

That being said, to ensure that you know where your money is going, hereís a breakdown of the main closing costs that youíll likely be responsible for as a buyer:

1. Attorney fees

Real estate attorneys research the ownership of the home, ensuring that the seller actually has the right to sell you the property. Though this is usually a formality, it is an important one.

Attorneys can either charge a flat fee or hourly rate.

2. Origination fees

The origination fee is paid upfront to the lender. Itís the fee that they charge for processing your mortgage application and getting you approved as a borrower.

3. Prepaid interest

Many buyers pay their first monthís interest in advance. This is the amount of interest that will accrue from the time you purchase the home until your first mortgage payment is due (a month later).

4. Home inspection

Inspections are one of the closing costs that can save you a ton of money in the long run if they find anything during their visit to the home. Inspectors should be licensed in your state, and you should choose your own inspector based on ratings and reviews (not at the recommendation of someone who is incentivized to sell you the home such).

5. Escrow deposits

Escrow deposits are typically shared between the buyer and seller and it is the fee that escrow agents charge for their services. You can think of an escrow as a neutral third party that keeps your money safe while purchasing a home.

6. Recording fees

All real estate purchases have to be recorded by the local government. Typically, this is performed by the county or town hall. Recording fees are charged whenever a real estate transaction occurs.

7. Underwriting fees

Mortgages are all about determining risk. A lender wants to know whether they will see a return on their investment by lending to you. To do so, they research your credit and income history. The fee the charge for this work is called the underwriting fee.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 12/22/2019

If youíre a first-time homebuyer, you might be wondering what all of the expenses you can expect to have when it comes time to close on your home.

Ideally, youíll want to understand all of the closing costs months in advance so that you can plan accordingly. However, even if youíre close to purchasing your first home, itís still useful to get to know closing costs better.

In todayís post, Iím going to cover the closing costs that are typically the buyerís responsibility.

Buyerís closing costs

Thereís good news and bad news when it comes to closing costs for buyers. The bad news is that buyers are typically on the hook for the majority of the closing costs associated with a real estate transaction. The good news, however, is that many of these fees will be grouped together as part of your mortgage, meaning you wonít have to devote much time or thought to them individually.

That being said, to ensure that you know where your money is going, hereís a breakdown of the main closing costs that youíll likely be responsible for as a buyer:

1. Attorney fees

Real estate attorneys research the ownership of the home, ensuring that the seller actually has the right to sell you the property. Though this is usually a formality, it is an important one.

Attorneys can either charge a flat fee or hourly rate.

2. Origination fees

The origination fee is paid upfront to the lender. Itís the fee that they charge for processing your mortgage application and getting you approved as a borrower.

3. Prepaid interest

Many buyers pay their first monthís interest in advance. This is the amount of interest that will accrue from the time you purchase the home until your first mortgage payment is due (a month later).

4. Home inspection

Inspections are one of the closing costs that can save you a ton of money in the long run if they find anything during their visit to the home. Inspectors should be licensed in your state, and you should choose your own inspector based on ratings and reviews (not at the recommendation of someone who is incentivized to sell you the home such).

5. Escrow deposits

Escrow deposits are typically shared between the buyer and seller and it is the fee that escrow agents charge for their services. You can think of an escrow as a neutral third party that keeps your money safe while purchasing a home.

6. Recording fees

All real estate purchases have to be recorded by the local government. Typically, this is performed by the county or town hall. Recording fees are charged whenever a real estate transaction occurs.

7. Underwriting fees

Mortgages are all about determining risk. A lender wants to know whether they will see a return on their investment by lending to you. To do so, they research your credit and income history. The fee the charge for this work is called the underwriting fee.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 12/10/2017

When youíre buying a home, thereís a lot of excitement that surrounds the search and purchase of the property. In the process of buying a home, however, there are many things that buyers forget to take into account during their search and budgeting. Below, youíll find some information to help you be prepared as a buyer to consider your home purchase from all angles without missing a beat.  


The Expense Of Closing Costs


Remember that closing costs will be somewhere in the 3-5 percent range of the purchase price of a home. Amidst all of your savings, youíll need to consider this a part of your expenses. Closing costs need to be paid upfront in most cases. You can roll your closing costs into the financing, but it depends on the circumstances. There are no guarantees that the lender will agree to it. Your realtor can also sometimes negotiate for the sellers to pay the closing costs, but in a sellerís market this is quite rare. Be prepared with your closing costs and understand how much youíll need to spend so that you have an appropriate amount for the downpayment and the other expenses that youíll incur during the process of buying a home.  


The Cost Of Maintaining A House


Many buyers forget about all of the costs that they will need to pay for after they finish buying the house. In addition to a monthly mortgage payment, youíll need to pay for things like utilities, routine home maintenance, furnishings, and more. If you completely deplete your savings for the purchase of the home, thereís not a whole lot of wiggle room for you to pay for additional needs in the house. 


The Cost Of Furnishing And Decorating A Home


You may move into a home with a few pieces that you have previously owned. You could also need a lot of things from a bed to a sofa. All of these items can add up. You may even have to worry about little things like window shades, curtains, lamps, light bulbs, and more. 


Home Repairs Can Cost A Pretty Penny


If something needs to be done in your home, the repairs can cost you quite a bit. If youíre not paying attention during the home inspection, youíll be in for some surprises. Thatís why you need a good realtor to help you through the process. A new roof can cost thousands of dollars. New appliances are an expense you should plan for. Other major work that needs to be done around the house can also dip into your savings significantly. As a buyer, you need to be prepared for any of these expected or completely unexpected costs.           




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/12/2017

If youíre thinking about buying a home, youíve probably heard a lot about closing costs. Closing costs can come at a hefty price- up to 5% of your homeís purchase price. When that amount must be paid up front, you need to make sure you have a sizable amount of cash on hand.  


Thereís many different kinds of fees included in the closing costs. Your lender will give you an estimate of what your closing costs will be, but you may not know what any of the terms that are included actually mean.  


The Loan Origination Fee


This is the fee charged by your lender that covers the administrative costs that are associated with creating and processing a mortgage. This could also be called an underwriting fee.   


Title Search Fee


This is how much the title insurance company charges to perform research on the title of the home. In some cases, the title may have some issues associated with it, so this research is to protect you. Thereís also title fees known as lenderís title insurance and ownerís title insurance. You need to have lenderís title insurance, but ownerís title insurance is completely optional.


Credit Report Fee


This covers the obtaining and review of your credit report. 


Application Fee


Thereís also a fee when it comes to reviewing your mortgage loan application. 


Home Appraisal


This fee covers the appraiser who is chosen by your mortgage company in order to assess an accurate value of the home.  


Tax Monitoring Fee


This fee supports tax research on the home to determine if property taxes have been paid. 


Survey


The property survey covers all aspects of the property bounds including gas lines, roads, walls, easements, property improvements, and encroachments. 


Attorney Fees


The attorney fees will cover all of the document reviews, the agreements, and the escrow fees.


Insurance Payments


When you close on a home, your entire first year of home insurance payments must be made at the time of closing. If you have bought your home with an FHA loan, youíll need to pay mortgage insurance premiums at closing as well. Youíll also need mortgage insurance payments if you put less than a 20% down payment on the home.  


Escrow Property Taxes


The lender requires that you pay your property taxes up front. This money will be held in escrow and the taxes paid from there.  


As you can see, thereís a lot that goes on during the closing of a home. Make sure you have some water handy, itís going to be a long process! Understanding what will happen at closing when you buy a home can help you to avoid any surprise fees or financial burdens.







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