RE/MAX Executive Realty



Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/16/2020


 Photo by Jay Mantri via Pixabay

A deck adds valuable outdoor living space to your home's square footage, but to be an asset, it needs to be well-maintained. If your deck has missed a few annual cleanings or is showing popped nails, splintered boards or water damage, consider resurfacing it instead of replacing it. The money you save will be significant. Here's how:

Inspect Your Existing Deck

Look for rot, termite damage, warped or weakened boards and missing screws. Fix any problems you find by replacing individual boards and railings with similar materials. Make sure everything is structurally sound and sanded smooth before moving forward with the next step. 

Choose the Right Deck Wash

Step two involves giving your deck a good scrubbing to remove all traces of algae, dirt, mildew or mold that may have formed. You'll need a good wire broom or brush, eye protection and waterproof gloves, because some deck wash can be damaging to skin. You'll want to protect any nearby plants as well. Cover them in plastic while washing down your deck. 

Deck wash can be painted on, sprayed on with a garden hose, or applied with a pressure washer. A simple mixture of laundry detergent, bleach and warm water may be all it takes to begin bringing your deck back to life. Once applied, work the cleaning solution into the wood using your brush or broom. Rinse clean and allow the wood to dry before proceeding to the next step in resurfacing your existing deck. 

Apply Deck Stain

Lastly, you'll need to re-stain to apply a protective coating to your freshly cleaned decking. For older wood that still shows imperfections, try using a semi-transparent stain, instead of something that's clear. This will help to hide flaws and resistant stains.

You can spray, roll or brush the stain onto the deck, or you can use a combination of techniques such as spraying the stain down, then using a brush or roller to even out puddles and to trim out around railings. Apply the stain evenly, and then add the second and third coats while the stain is still damp. This helps keep old, thirsty wood from absorbing all the stain. Once applied, you'll need to re-stain your deck every other year to keep it looking its best. 

The total cost to replace your old deck can run upwards of $10,000, says ProRemodeler. Compare that with the $4,000 you might spend to replace worn boards and connectors, and you're looking at a significant savings. If your existing deck is worth repairing, that's usually the better option. But it must be structurally sound by the time the work is done. If you're unsure, call in a pro for an inspection. 





Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/16/2020

Image by Capri23auto from Pixabay

It’s not unusual for homebuyers to enter the market with some preconceived notions about the differences between an existing home and new construction. These may be formed by talking to friends and loved ones about their successes and challenges. Others come from media sources, including the seemingly endless stream of reality home shows.

Regardless of how your ideas have been formed, it’s in every buyer’s best interest to conduct some due diligence and explore the gaps between opinions, myths, and real estate facts. Weighing the following pros and cons of new construction may help you hone your understanding and make a truly informed decision.

1: Home Customization May Be An Option

It’s important to distinguish between two types of new construction. There is the type in which you work directly with a builder and architect to design a home unique to your standards and desires. There’s also the type in which the house is already built, and you would be the first occupant. The idea that buying new automatically delivers input into the design is only reserved for the former. If you want control from the drawing board to turning the key, that can certainly be achieved by enlisting an architect and construction outfit.

2: New Home Customization Can Be Expensive

While adding all the latest Smart technology and energy-efficient products can provide the quality of life you are pursuing, these items do come at a premium. Some estimates place Smart technology options at a 30- to 50-percent higher cost than conventional appliances and devices. New construction costs also hover at approximately $150 per square foot and can uptick considerably if you plan to integrate high-end materials or unique floor plans. Customization can certainly result in the dream home you imagine. However, there may be a nightmarish price tag included.

3: New Home Construction More Energy Efficient

Energy expert resources generally agree that new homes and those built after 2000, are widely more energy-efficient than those built in the 20th Century. New construction living spaces utilize and estimated 20 percent less energy, on average and new HVAC systems could outpace older homes by as much as 50 percent. That equals real dollars and cents savings on monthly utility bills and annual home expenses.

4: New Construction May Lack Quality Materials

It’s an open secret that the construction industry utilizes more inexpensively crafted materials than older homes. For example, many new construction homes present the image of hardwood flooring at first blush. But upon further review, the materials used are sometimes floating flooring or far thinner than yesteryear oak and other hardwoods. While new construction usually likes quite shiny, the materials to build it may lack the durability and luster of older existing homes.

5: New Construction Is A Double-Edged Landscaping Sword

Buying a newly constructed home often means that you will have pleasure — or chore — of designing the grounds as well. The upside usually involves planning your outdoor living space precisely the way you want it. Options such as stone patios, verandas, permanent outdoor cooking stations and garden placement, among others, are all on the table.

But the downside is that a new landscape will not necessarily enjoy the robust aged trees, large flowering shrubs and deeply rooted lawns of established grounds. That may seem like six-in-one-hand and a half-dozen in the other. Those are the little differences that you are tasked with weighing when making an informed decision between new construction and an existing home.  




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Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/16/2020

Photo by David Mark via Pixabay

Picking the right veterinarian for your pets matters. It will put you at ease every time they need a healing touch. Whether you're new in town, or your pet has a specific issue you'd like carefully tended, here's how to find a vet who will offer you a high standard of care.

Finding the Best Vet in Town: Where to Start

You can start with a simple search: "veterinarian near me." Then, take a look at each website that comes up on the first page of search results. Check out the vets' biographies. Do they belong to the American Veterinary Medical Association? What about your state's or region's veterinary medical association? These are key credentials.

Now, talk with your neighbors who take a keen interest in their pets' well-being. They will be able to give you recommendations. Don't just ask your neighbor which office they use. Ask which of the practice's vets they couldn't do without!

Confirming What You Learn: Supplementing Your Pick With an Online Search

The two strategies above, combined, will start a solid, well-informed search.

Round your strategy out by going onto the online review sites (such as Yelp or Google), and confirm the opinion you have made.

Sure, some people use review sites to vent. But many clients use the sites to praise particular vets and their pets' experiences. And the negative reviews are likely to be answered in a polite, professional way by a good veterinary office.

Your Pet's First Visit: How You'll Know You've Found the Right Expert 

During your first appointment, consider all of these aspects good signs:

  • The place is clean. It looks busy, but not unmanageably hectic.
  • The office staff members are polite and understanding when answering calls.
  • Both the staff and the vet make you and your pet feel respected, and put you at ease. 
  • There is a caring protocol for pets' pain management. Neutering and spaying, for example, include pain relief medicine.

You'll want to know there are at least two vets on staff, to offer adequate coverage for absences. And the office should offer at least some weekend hours.

Changing Course: When the Time Comes to Switch Vet Practices

Do not be embarrassed about switching to a new vet if you develop concerns about your current practice. You might also just wish to go with another, highly recommended vet.

But do collect all the necessary information before you switch. Ask for full records pertaining to your pet. These might be handed to you on a disk, or sent directly to your new vet.

Best wishes settling in with the perfect vet to oversee the health of your best buddies for life.




Tags: moving   Veterinarian   Local Vet  
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Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/9/2020

Want to add your house to the real estate market? Work with an expert real estate agent, and you can streamline the home selling process.

A real estate agent can make a world of difference for any home seller, at any time. This housing market professional will teach you the ins and outs of selling a home and ensure you can get the best price for your residence. Plus, he or she will be ready to respond to your home selling questions and provide consistent support as the home selling journey progresses.

Ultimately, it is important to understand what it takes to work with a real estate agent. This will allow you to maintain a positive approach throughout the home selling process. It might help you improve your chances of a quick sale too.

What does it take to work with a real estate agent? Here are three rules that every home seller should consider.

1. Hire a Real Estate Agent That Makes You Feel Comfortable

Selling a home can be stressful, particularly for a first-time property seller. Fortunately, working with the right real estate agent ensures you can receive world-class home selling guidance.

As a home seller, you should employ a real estate agent that makes you feel comfortable. This housing market professional will be able to alleviate your home selling concerns and guarantee you are fully supported at each stage of the home selling journey.

2. Keep the Lines of Communication Open at All Times

What good is a real estate agent if he or she won't keep you up to date about home showings, offers on your residence and homebuyer feedback?

For a home seller, it is paramount to collaborate with a real estate agent who can provide immediate assistance. This housing market professional should be ready to communicate with you via phone, email and text and provide regular updates throughout the home selling cycle.

Your real estate agent also should be unafraid to be honest with you. That way, you can receive unbiased suggestions and recommendations from your real estate agent that can help you make informed home selling decisions.

3. Understand That Problems May Arise During Home Selling Process

Although a real estate agent will do everything possible to promote your house to the right groups of property buyers, it is vital to remember that the real estate market offers no guarantees. In addition, problems sometimes may arise that may slow down the home selling journey.

Your real estate agent should be able to describe challenges that you may encounter before you add your residence to the housing market. This will enable you to plan ahead and allocate the necessary time and resources to reduce the risk of such problems.

Hiring a real estate agent to help you sell your house may seem difficult at first. But with the aforementioned tips, you can find an expert real estate professional who will make it easy for you to sell your residence.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by RE/MAX Executive Realty on 2/9/2020

Image by Lutz Peter from Pixabay

Insulation keeps you warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer by reducing either heat coming in or escaping from your home. You might think that adequately insulating a home would be part of the home-building process. But since many new homebuyers don't consider insulation when buying, many home builders only meet bare minimum standards. Fortunately, you can add insulation yourself. 

Where Do You Need More Insulation?

Ceilings and attics are a great place to start. But you also need insulation inside your outer walls. Insulating an un-air conditioned crawlspace or basement can also reduce that air from impacting your home environment. And insulation around pipes reduces the risk of cracking in cold weather.

You'll likely only need insulation on interior walls if your goal is to reduce the sound that travels through the home. If you need insulation inside your walls, interior or exterior, it's best to contact a professional.

How to Install Installation on Your Pipes

You don't have to cover all of the pipe to make a difference. But the more you cover, the less the risk.

The best way to insulate pipes is with foam insulators. These are made to fit most pipes and easy to install. For this project, you just need foam insulators and a utility knife to cut them and duct tape for the corners and oddly-shaped pipes.

Step one: Locate at-risk pipes. Size them up and cut foam pieces to match your measurements.

Step two: Find the opening in the insulator and slide it around the pipe, using several insulators end-to-end to cover the whole pipe. *Pro tip* If the insulators don't fit snuggly or are oddly shaped, unfold insulators and use duct tape to hold them together.

How to Install Insulation in the Attic or Basement

To keep it simple, we'll share how to install roll insulation. Blow insulation is a more involved project so you may want to hire a professional.

You'll need:

  • Work gloves
  • A mouth/nose mask
  • A roll of insulation
  • Staple gun
  • Staples
  • A 2X4 board
  • Utility knife
  • Duct tape (optional)
  • *Pro tip* Don't unroll your insulation until you get it into the area where you'll staple it. It will expand--a lot.

    Step one: Put on your mask and work gloves. Touching insulation directly or breathing it into your lungs or throat will be an itchy experience you'll want to avoid.

    Step two: Cut the insulation into manageable sections. *Pro Tip* Lay the 2X4 on top of the rolled out insulation to press it down for a smoother cut.

    Step three: Using your staple gun, affix the insulation to the rafters, walls and other surfaces on the outside of the building. If your basement has stone walls with no beams, you won't be able to staple insulation there. Use duct tape instead to cover the area.

    For more tips and tricks to improve your space with simple DIY projects, follow our blog.







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